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The Two Faces of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer

The Two Faces of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer Reactive oxygen species (ROS), now appreciated for their cellular signaling capabilities, have a dual role in cancer. On the one hand, ROS can promote protumorigenic signaling, facilitating cancer cell proliferation, survival, and adaptation to hypoxia. On the other hand, ROS can promote antitumorigenic signaling and trigger oxidative stress–induced cancer cell death. To hyperactivate the cell signaling pathways necessary for cellular transformation and tumorigenesis, cancer cells increase their rate of ROS production compared with normal cells. Concomitantly, in order to maintain ROS homeostasis and evade cell death, cancer cells increase their antioxidant capacity. Compared with normal cells, this altered redox environment of cancer cells may increase their susceptibility to ROS-manipulation therapies. In this review, we discuss the two faces of ROS in cancer, the potential mechanisms underlying ROS signaling, and the opposing cancer therapeutic approaches to targeting ROS. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Cancer Biology Annual Reviews

The Two Faces of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cancer

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
2472-3428
eISSN
2472-3428
DOI
10.1146/annurev-cancerbio-041916-065808
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), now appreciated for their cellular signaling capabilities, have a dual role in cancer. On the one hand, ROS can promote protumorigenic signaling, facilitating cancer cell proliferation, survival, and adaptation to hypoxia. On the other hand, ROS can promote antitumorigenic signaling and trigger oxidative stress–induced cancer cell death. To hyperactivate the cell signaling pathways necessary for cellular transformation and tumorigenesis, cancer cells increase their rate of ROS production compared with normal cells. Concomitantly, in order to maintain ROS homeostasis and evade cell death, cancer cells increase their antioxidant capacity. Compared with normal cells, this altered redox environment of cancer cells may increase their susceptibility to ROS-manipulation therapies. In this review, we discuss the two faces of ROS in cancer, the potential mechanisms underlying ROS signaling, and the opposing cancer therapeutic approaches to targeting ROS.

Journal

Annual Review of Cancer BiologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 6, 2017

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