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The Immunology of Epstein-Barr Virus–Induced Disease

The Immunology of Epstein-Barr Virus–Induced Disease Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is usually acquired silently early in life and carried thereafter as an asymptomatic infection of the B lymphoid system. However, many circumstances disturb the delicate EBV-host balance and cause the virus to display its pathogenic potential. Thus, primary infection in adolescence can manifest as infectious mononucleosis (IM), as a fatal illness that magnifies the immunopathology of IM in boys with the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease trait, and as a chronic active disease leading to life-threatening hemophagocytosis in rare cases of T or natural killer (NK) cell infection. Patients with primary immunodeficiencies affecting the NK and/or T cell systems, as well as immunosuppressed transplant recipients, handle EBV infections poorly, and many are at increased risk of virus-driven B-lymphoproliferative disease. By contrast, a range of other EBV-positive malignancies of lymphoid or epithelial origin arise in individuals with seemingly intact immune systems through mechanisms that remain to be understood. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev-immunol-032414-112326
pmid
25706097
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is usually acquired silently early in life and carried thereafter as an asymptomatic infection of the B lymphoid system. However, many circumstances disturb the delicate EBV-host balance and cause the virus to display its pathogenic potential. Thus, primary infection in adolescence can manifest as infectious mononucleosis (IM), as a fatal illness that magnifies the immunopathology of IM in boys with the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease trait, and as a chronic active disease leading to life-threatening hemophagocytosis in rare cases of T or natural killer (NK) cell infection. Patients with primary immunodeficiencies affecting the NK and/or T cell systems, as well as immunosuppressed transplant recipients, handle EBV infections poorly, and many are at increased risk of virus-driven B-lymphoproliferative disease. By contrast, a range of other EBV-positive malignancies of lymphoid or epithelial origin arise in individuals with seemingly intact immune systems through mechanisms that remain to be understood.

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Mar 21, 2015

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