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The Biology of Interleukin-2

The Biology of Interleukin-2 Much data support an essential role for interleukin (IL)-2 in immune tolerance. This idea is much different from the early paradigm in which IL-2 is central for protective immune responses. This change in thinking occurred when a T regulatory cell defect was shown to be responsible for the lethal autoimmunity associated with IL-2/IL-2R deficiency. This realization allowed investigators to explore immune responses in IL-2-nonresponsive mice rendered autoimmune-free. Such studies established that IL-2 sometimes contributes to optimal primary immune responses, but it is not mandatory. Emerging findings, however, suggest an essential role for IL-2 in immune memory. Here, the current understanding of the dual role of IL-2 in maintaining tolerance and contributing to immunity in vivo is reviewed with some emphasis on T regulatory cell production and homeostasis. Also discussed are implications of this new appreciation concerning the immunobiology of IL-2 with respect to targeting IL-2 or its receptor in immunotherapy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

The Biology of Interleukin-2

Annual Review of Immunology , Volume 26 – Apr 23, 2008

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev.immunol.26.021607.090357
pmid
18062768
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Much data support an essential role for interleukin (IL)-2 in immune tolerance. This idea is much different from the early paradigm in which IL-2 is central for protective immune responses. This change in thinking occurred when a T regulatory cell defect was shown to be responsible for the lethal autoimmunity associated with IL-2/IL-2R deficiency. This realization allowed investigators to explore immune responses in IL-2-nonresponsive mice rendered autoimmune-free. Such studies established that IL-2 sometimes contributes to optimal primary immune responses, but it is not mandatory. Emerging findings, however, suggest an essential role for IL-2 in immune memory. Here, the current understanding of the dual role of IL-2 in maintaining tolerance and contributing to immunity in vivo is reviewed with some emphasis on T regulatory cell production and homeostasis. Also discussed are implications of this new appreciation concerning the immunobiology of IL-2 with respect to targeting IL-2 or its receptor in immunotherapy.

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 23, 2008

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