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Subjective Cognitive Decline in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

Subjective Cognitive Decline in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease Older adults with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) in the absence of objective neuropsychological dysfunction are increasingly viewed as at risk for non-normative cognitive decline and eventual progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. The past decade has witnessed tremendous growth in research on SCD, which may reflect the recognition of SCD as the earliest symptomatic manifestation of AD. Yet methodological challenges associated with establishing common assessment and classification procedures hamper the construct. This article reviews essential features of SCD associated with preclinical AD and current measurement approaches, highlighting challenges in harmonizing study findings across settings. We consider the relation of SCD to important variables and outcomes (e.g., AD biomarkers, clinical progression). We also examine the role of self- and informant-reports in SCD and various psychological, medical, and demographic factors that influence the self-report of cognition. We conclude with a discussion of intervention strategies for SCD, ethical considerations, and future research priorities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Annual Reviews

Subjective Cognitive Decline in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
1548-5943
eISSN
1548-5951
DOI
10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032816-045136
pmid
28482688
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Older adults with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) in the absence of objective neuropsychological dysfunction are increasingly viewed as at risk for non-normative cognitive decline and eventual progression to Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia. The past decade has witnessed tremendous growth in research on SCD, which may reflect the recognition of SCD as the earliest symptomatic manifestation of AD. Yet methodological challenges associated with establishing common assessment and classification procedures hamper the construct. This article reviews essential features of SCD associated with preclinical AD and current measurement approaches, highlighting challenges in harmonizing study findings across settings. We consider the relation of SCD to important variables and outcomes (e.g., AD biomarkers, clinical progression). We also examine the role of self- and informant-reports in SCD and various psychological, medical, and demographic factors that influence the self-report of cognition. We conclude with a discussion of intervention strategies for SCD, ethical considerations, and future research priorities.

Journal

Annual Review of Clinical PsychologyAnnual Reviews

Published: May 8, 2017

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