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New Concepts in the Immunopathogenesis of HIV Infection

New Concepts in the Immunopathogenesis of HIV Infection The typical course of HIV infection is characterized by multiple phases that occur over a period of eight to ten years. A critical event in the initial establishment major reservoirs for HIV and as primary sites for virus replication. of HIV infection is the localization of HIV in lymphoid organs that serve as Despite the fact that the majority of HIV-infected individuals do not show any clinical signs of disease activity for extended periods of time, HIV disease is active and progressive in lymphoid organs during this clinically latent period. Persistence that ultimately leads to destruction of the lymphoid tissue and loss of the ability to respond to HIV and/or other pathogens. usage of certain variable domains (V) of the beta of virus in lymphoid organs causes a chronic stimulation of the immune system Major expansions of restricted subsets of CD8+ T cells determined by the (f3) chain of the T cell receptor patients were studied thus far, certain patterns have emerged that appear to cor­ relate with the subsequent clinical outcome. It is conceivable that immunologic and virologic events associated with the ultimate course of HIV disease. mune responses with cytolytic T cell activity. Although only limited http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

New Concepts in the Immunopathogenesis of HIV Infection

Annual Review of Immunology , Volume 13 (1) – Apr 1, 1995

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1995 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev.iy.13.040195.002415
pmid
7612232
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The typical course of HIV infection is characterized by multiple phases that occur over a period of eight to ten years. A critical event in the initial establishment major reservoirs for HIV and as primary sites for virus replication. of HIV infection is the localization of HIV in lymphoid organs that serve as Despite the fact that the majority of HIV-infected individuals do not show any clinical signs of disease activity for extended periods of time, HIV disease is active and progressive in lymphoid organs during this clinically latent period. Persistence that ultimately leads to destruction of the lymphoid tissue and loss of the ability to respond to HIV and/or other pathogens. usage of certain variable domains (V) of the beta of virus in lymphoid organs causes a chronic stimulation of the immune system Major expansions of restricted subsets of CD8+ T cells determined by the (f3) chain of the T cell receptor patients were studied thus far, certain patterns have emerged that appear to cor­ relate with the subsequent clinical outcome. It is conceivable that immunologic and virologic events associated with the ultimate course of HIV disease. mune responses with cytolytic T cell activity. Although only limited

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 1, 1995

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