Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: Emergence of a Pathogenic Human Coronavirus

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: Emergence of a Pathogenic Human Coronavirus In 2012, a zoonotic coronavirus was identified as the causative agent of Middle East respiratory syndrome and was named MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). As of August 11, 2016, the virus has infected 1,791 patients, with a mortality rate of 35.6%. Although MERS-CoV generally causes subclinical or mild disease, infection can result in serious outcomes, including acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure in patients with comorbidities. The virus is endemic in camels in the Arabian Peninsula and Africa and thus poses a consistent threat of frequent reintroduction into human populations. Disease prevalence will increase substantially if the virus mutates to increase human-to-human transmissibility. No therapeutics or vaccines are approved for MERS; thus, development of novel therapies is needed. Further, since many MERS cases are acquired in healthcare settings, public health measures and scrupulous attention to infection control are required to prevent additional MERS outbreaks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Medicine Annual Reviews

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome: Emergence of a Pathogenic Human Coronavirus

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/middle-east-respiratory-syndrome-emergence-of-a-pathogenic-human-E8uZa4CO5I
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
ISSN
0066-4219
eISSN
1545-326X
DOI
10.1146/annurev-med-051215-031152
pmid
27576010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In 2012, a zoonotic coronavirus was identified as the causative agent of Middle East respiratory syndrome and was named MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV). As of August 11, 2016, the virus has infected 1,791 patients, with a mortality rate of 35.6%. Although MERS-CoV generally causes subclinical or mild disease, infection can result in serious outcomes, including acute respiratory distress syndrome and multi-organ failure in patients with comorbidities. The virus is endemic in camels in the Arabian Peninsula and Africa and thus poses a consistent threat of frequent reintroduction into human populations. Disease prevalence will increase substantially if the virus mutates to increase human-to-human transmissibility. No therapeutics or vaccines are approved for MERS; thus, development of novel therapies is needed. Further, since many MERS cases are acquired in healthcare settings, public health measures and scrupulous attention to infection control are required to prevent additional MERS outbreaks.

Journal

Annual Review of MedicineAnnual Reviews

Published: Jan 14, 2017

There are no references for this article.