Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Immune Responses in MHC Class II-Deficient MICE

Immune Responses in MHC Class II-Deficient MICE Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are heterodimeric cell surface proteins that are critically important for the development and function of cells in the immune system. In particular, the maturation of CD4+ T cells is dependent on the expression of MHC class II molecules on thymic epithelium, while the activation of these cells requires the expression of class II molecules on specialized antigen-presenting cells in the periphery. The importance of class II molecules is especially evident in humans who are afflicted with MHC class II-deficient combined immunodeficiency, as these individuals die at an early age unless provided with a bone marrow transplant. Here we discuss the functional consequences of MHC class II deficiency in a mouse model generated by gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells. These mice have proved to be valuable reagents for dissecting the mechanisms by which MHC class II molecules control the maturation and activation of lymphocytes as well as for elucidating the role of these cells in various immune responses. INTRODUCTION As with any complex biological system, our understanding of the development and function of cells in the immune system has been aided by the study of mutants. For example, mice harboring http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

Immune Responses in MHC Class II-Deficient MICE

Annual Review of Immunology , Volume 13 (1) – Apr 1, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/annual-reviews/immune-responses-in-mhc-class-ii-deficient-mice-cq5qalffBA
Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1995 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev.iy.13.040195.002221
pmid
7612230
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are heterodimeric cell surface proteins that are critically important for the development and function of cells in the immune system. In particular, the maturation of CD4+ T cells is dependent on the expression of MHC class II molecules on thymic epithelium, while the activation of these cells requires the expression of class II molecules on specialized antigen-presenting cells in the periphery. The importance of class II molecules is especially evident in humans who are afflicted with MHC class II-deficient combined immunodeficiency, as these individuals die at an early age unless provided with a bone marrow transplant. Here we discuss the functional consequences of MHC class II deficiency in a mouse model generated by gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells. These mice have proved to be valuable reagents for dissecting the mechanisms by which MHC class II molecules control the maturation and activation of lymphocytes as well as for elucidating the role of these cells in various immune responses. INTRODUCTION As with any complex biological system, our understanding of the development and function of cells in the immune system has been aided by the study of mutants. For example, mice harboring

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.