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Genes of the T-Cell Antigen Receptor in Normal and Malignant T Cells

Genes of the T-Cell Antigen Receptor in Normal and Malignant T Cells Continuous surveillance for invasions by foreign antigens (Ag) is the responsibility of the vertebrate immune system. A response is first elicited when foreign antigens are identified by receptor proteins produced by B and T lymphocytes known as the immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell-antigen receptors (TcR), respectively. The structures ofIg proteins and genes have been well characterized. The Ig molecule has a variable domain at its amino terminus responsible for the Ag specificity, and this is attached to a mOre constant domain at the carboxyl terminus (I, 2). Depending on the isotype of the Ig constant domain, various effector functions are possible. Whether bound to the B-cell surface or as a secreted molecule, the Ig recognizes and binds to a specific Ag. The most striking contrast between B- and T-cell activation is that T cells require dual recognition of Ag and a polymorphic gene product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This phenomenon is known as MHC-restricted recognition (3). A further constraint is that the MHC product recognized must be that of the host organism (i.e. self MHC). The "education" of T cells is believed to be in the thymus at the level of the surface membrane bound TcR. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

Genes of the T-Cell Antigen Receptor in Normal and Malignant T Cells

Annual Review of Immunology , Volume 5 (1) – Apr 1, 1987

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev.iy.05.040187.003101
pmid
3297109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Continuous surveillance for invasions by foreign antigens (Ag) is the responsibility of the vertebrate immune system. A response is first elicited when foreign antigens are identified by receptor proteins produced by B and T lymphocytes known as the immunoglobulin (Ig) and T-cell-antigen receptors (TcR), respectively. The structures ofIg proteins and genes have been well characterized. The Ig molecule has a variable domain at its amino terminus responsible for the Ag specificity, and this is attached to a mOre constant domain at the carboxyl terminus (I, 2). Depending on the isotype of the Ig constant domain, various effector functions are possible. Whether bound to the B-cell surface or as a secreted molecule, the Ig recognizes and binds to a specific Ag. The most striking contrast between B- and T-cell activation is that T cells require dual recognition of Ag and a polymorphic gene product of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). This phenomenon is known as MHC-restricted recognition (3). A further constraint is that the MHC product recognized must be that of the host organism (i.e. self MHC). The "education" of T cells is believed to be in the thymus at the level of the surface membrane bound TcR. The

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 1, 1987

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