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Disorders of Phagocyte Function

Disorders of Phagocyte Function and Historical Background Over a century ago Metchnikoffformulated the phagocytic theory of host defenses. In experiments with marine invertebrates, Metchnikoff noted that certain strains of the invading fungus were ingested and destroyed by phagocytes. Other strains were not attacked, and a disseminated fatal disease then developed ( 1). Metchnikoff predicted that abnormalities of phagocytic cells would compromise host defenses. A century later this concept was commonly demonstrated by the development of over­ whelming bacterial and fungal infection in conditions resulting in severe quantitative or functional deficiencies of circulating neutrophils. Beginning with Janeway's description in 1954, of a "fatal granulomatous disease of childhood" (2), several intrinsic disorders of phagocytic cells have been characterized. In the past 15 years, application of new techniques and intense interest in the biology of phagocytic cells have greatly promoted knowledge of factors regulating leukocyte function. The present discussion is not intended to be an exhaustive review of phagocyte defects but is focused on well-characterized and historically important disorders and emphasizes recent advances in our knowledge of the underlying defects. For a detailed discussion of the evaluation and management of patients with phagocyte defects, the reader is referred to several recent reviews (3-6). Adherence Related http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

Disorders of Phagocyte Function

Annual Review of Immunology , Volume 5 (1) – Apr 1, 1987

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev.iy.05.040187.001015
pmid
3297103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

and Historical Background Over a century ago Metchnikoffformulated the phagocytic theory of host defenses. In experiments with marine invertebrates, Metchnikoff noted that certain strains of the invading fungus were ingested and destroyed by phagocytes. Other strains were not attacked, and a disseminated fatal disease then developed ( 1). Metchnikoff predicted that abnormalities of phagocytic cells would compromise host defenses. A century later this concept was commonly demonstrated by the development of over­ whelming bacterial and fungal infection in conditions resulting in severe quantitative or functional deficiencies of circulating neutrophils. Beginning with Janeway's description in 1954, of a "fatal granulomatous disease of childhood" (2), several intrinsic disorders of phagocytic cells have been characterized. In the past 15 years, application of new techniques and intense interest in the biology of phagocytic cells have greatly promoted knowledge of factors regulating leukocyte function. The present discussion is not intended to be an exhaustive review of phagocyte defects but is focused on well-characterized and historically important disorders and emphasizes recent advances in our knowledge of the underlying defects. For a detailed discussion of the evaluation and management of patients with phagocyte defects, the reader is referred to several recent reviews (3-6). Adherence Related

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 1, 1987

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