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Classification of the Behavior Disorders

Classification of the Behavior Disorders By JOSEPH ZUBIN1 Biometrics Research, New York State Department of Mental Hygiene, and Columbia University, New York, New York An essential step for clarifying a field that is as confused as the clas­ sification of behavior disorders is to provide some specific definitions for the terms to be used. While definitions can never be rigorous and complete except in mathematics, they nevertheless serve to demarcate a concept even though its boundaries remain somewhat blurred. Classification, following Hempel (19), divides a set of objects into subclasses according to certain common characteristics. In the field of behavior disorders, a classification system attempts to classify the population of those suffering from behavior disorders into diagnostic subgroups according to certain common signs, symptoms, and other identifying characteristics. The resulting classification system will depend upon several basic considerations. First, is the goal of the classification, second, the definition of the universe of patients, and third, the specification of the various subcategories into which the popula­ tion under examination is classified. Variations in these goals and definitions will result in placing the same individual in different categories or in an excluded category outside of the universe of discourse. For this reason it is important http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Psychology Annual Reviews

Classification of the Behavior Disorders

Annual Review of Psychology , Volume 18 (1) – Feb 1, 1967

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References (17)

Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1967 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0066-4308
eISSN
1545-2085
DOI
10.1146/annurev.ps.18.020167.002105
pmid
5333426
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

By JOSEPH ZUBIN1 Biometrics Research, New York State Department of Mental Hygiene, and Columbia University, New York, New York An essential step for clarifying a field that is as confused as the clas­ sification of behavior disorders is to provide some specific definitions for the terms to be used. While definitions can never be rigorous and complete except in mathematics, they nevertheless serve to demarcate a concept even though its boundaries remain somewhat blurred. Classification, following Hempel (19), divides a set of objects into subclasses according to certain common characteristics. In the field of behavior disorders, a classification system attempts to classify the population of those suffering from behavior disorders into diagnostic subgroups according to certain common signs, symptoms, and other identifying characteristics. The resulting classification system will depend upon several basic considerations. First, is the goal of the classification, second, the definition of the universe of patients, and third, the specification of the various subcategories into which the popula­ tion under examination is classified. Variations in these goals and definitions will result in placing the same individual in different categories or in an excluded category outside of the universe of discourse. For this reason it is important

Journal

Annual Review of PsychologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Feb 1, 1967

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