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A Peripatetic and Personal View of Molecular Immunology for One Third of the Century

A Peripatetic and Personal View of Molecular Immunology for One Third of the Century I always felt as inclined toward literature, history, and Latin as toward science, but as far back as I can remember I wanted to be a scientist. Most probably this was because of my loving esteem for an unde, an inorganic chemist who, after working at a Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Berlin, spent ten years in Moscow as a foreign guest. He visited us often in Poland when he was going on holiday-or for science-to the West. He returned to Poland to live just before World War II broke out. The last I heard of him was that both he and my aunt had committed suicide by taking cyanide in the Baranowicze ghetto, to avoid deportation. After my first 1 1 years in Poland and another 5 in Rumania, I reached Palestine in February 1941, together with my parents. That year I started studying chemistry and physics at the Hebrew University on Jerusalem's Mount Scopus. With Andor Fodor, the first professor appointed to the University when it was founded in 1925, I did my master's thesis on the synthesis of some derivatives of glutamine. I worked under the supervision of Noah Lichenstein, who taught me order and precision http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Immunology Annual Reviews

A Peripatetic and Personal View of Molecular Immunology for One Third of the Century

Annual Review of Immunology , Volume 5 (1) – Apr 1, 1987

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Publisher
Annual Reviews
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Annual Reviews. All rights reserved
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0732-0582
eISSN
1545-3278
DOI
10.1146/annurev.iy.05.040187.000245
pmid
3297102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I always felt as inclined toward literature, history, and Latin as toward science, but as far back as I can remember I wanted to be a scientist. Most probably this was because of my loving esteem for an unde, an inorganic chemist who, after working at a Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Berlin, spent ten years in Moscow as a foreign guest. He visited us often in Poland when he was going on holiday-or for science-to the West. He returned to Poland to live just before World War II broke out. The last I heard of him was that both he and my aunt had committed suicide by taking cyanide in the Baranowicze ghetto, to avoid deportation. After my first 1 1 years in Poland and another 5 in Rumania, I reached Palestine in February 1941, together with my parents. That year I started studying chemistry and physics at the Hebrew University on Jerusalem's Mount Scopus. With Andor Fodor, the first professor appointed to the University when it was founded in 1925, I did my master's thesis on the synthesis of some derivatives of glutamine. I worked under the supervision of Noah Lichenstein, who taught me order and precision

Journal

Annual Review of ImmunologyAnnual Reviews

Published: Apr 1, 1987

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