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Influenza Seasonality: Underlying Causes and Modeling Theories

Influenza Seasonality: Underlying Causes and Modeling Theories <h2>INFLUENZA SEASONALITY: VIROLOGICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES</h2> Influenza (or “flu”) leads to the hospitalization of more than 200,000 people yearly and results in 36,000 deaths from flu or flu-related complications in the United States ( 15 ), striking both the elderly and infant populations particularly hard ( 24 ). Two members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, the influenza A and B viruses, are the primary causes of this acute viral respiratory disease. Both viruses are characterized as enveloped viruses that contain eight negative-stranded RNA segments that encode 9 structural and 2 nonstructural proteins (influenza A virus) or 10 structural and 1 nonstructural protein (influenza B virus). Because of the higher levels of morbidity and mortality associated with influenza A virus, in part due to the large reservoir of the virus in aquatic birds, we will restrict ourselves to discussions of this virus. Each influenza A virus particle is surrounded by a host cell membrane, where two out of three surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), are responsible for viral entry into the host cell and are the targets of B-cell immunity ( 13 ). While 15 subtypes of HA and 9 subtypes of NA exist in the wild, historically http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Virology American Society For Microbiology

Influenza Seasonality: Underlying Causes and Modeling Theories

Influenza Seasonality: Underlying Causes and Modeling Theories

Journal of Virology , Volume 81 (11): 5429 – Jun 1, 2007

Abstract

<h2>INFLUENZA SEASONALITY: VIROLOGICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES</h2> Influenza (or “flu”) leads to the hospitalization of more than 200,000 people yearly and results in 36,000 deaths from flu or flu-related complications in the United States ( 15 ), striking both the elderly and infant populations particularly hard ( 24 ). Two members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, the influenza A and B viruses, are the primary causes of this acute viral respiratory disease. Both viruses are characterized as enveloped viruses that contain eight negative-stranded RNA segments that encode 9 structural and 2 nonstructural proteins (influenza A virus) or 10 structural and 1 nonstructural protein (influenza B virus). Because of the higher levels of morbidity and mortality associated with influenza A virus, in part due to the large reservoir of the virus in aquatic birds, we will restrict ourselves to discussions of this virus. Each influenza A virus particle is surrounded by a host cell membrane, where two out of three surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), are responsible for viral entry into the host cell and are the targets of B-cell immunity ( 13 ). While 15 subtypes of HA and 9 subtypes of NA exist in the wild, historically

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Publisher
American Society For Microbiology
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by the American society for Microbiology.
ISSN
0022-538X
eISSN
1098-5514
DOI
10.1128/JVI.01680-06
pmid
17182688
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<h2>INFLUENZA SEASONALITY: VIROLOGICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES</h2> Influenza (or “flu”) leads to the hospitalization of more than 200,000 people yearly and results in 36,000 deaths from flu or flu-related complications in the United States ( 15 ), striking both the elderly and infant populations particularly hard ( 24 ). Two members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, the influenza A and B viruses, are the primary causes of this acute viral respiratory disease. Both viruses are characterized as enveloped viruses that contain eight negative-stranded RNA segments that encode 9 structural and 2 nonstructural proteins (influenza A virus) or 10 structural and 1 nonstructural protein (influenza B virus). Because of the higher levels of morbidity and mortality associated with influenza A virus, in part due to the large reservoir of the virus in aquatic birds, we will restrict ourselves to discussions of this virus. Each influenza A virus particle is surrounded by a host cell membrane, where two out of three surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), are responsible for viral entry into the host cell and are the targets of B-cell immunity ( 13 ). While 15 subtypes of HA and 9 subtypes of NA exist in the wild, historically

Journal

Journal of VirologyAmerican Society For Microbiology

Published: Jun 1, 2007

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