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What You See Is What You Set: Sustained Inattentional Blindness and the Capture of Awareness

What You See Is What You Set: Sustained Inattentional Blindness and the Capture of Awareness This article reports a theoretical and experimental attempt to relate and contrast 2 traditionally separate research programs: inattentional blindness and attention capture. Inattentional blindness refers to failures to notice unexpected objects and events when attention is otherwise engaged. Attention capture research has traditionally used implicit indices (e.g., response times) to investigate automatic shifts of attention. Because attention capture usually measures performance whereas inattentional blindness measures awareness, the 2 fields have existed side by side with no shared theoretical framework. Here, the authors propose a theoretical unification, adapting several important effects from the attention capture literature to the context of sustained inattentional blindness. Although some stimulus properties can influence noticing of unexpected objects, the most influential factor affecting noticing is a person's own attentional goals. The authors conclude that many—but not all—aspects of attention capture apply to inattentional blindness but that these 2 classes of phenomena remain importantly distinct. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychological Review American Psychological Association

What You See Is What You Set: Sustained Inattentional Blindness and the Capture of Awareness

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0033-295x
eISSN
1939-1471
DOI
10.1037/0033-295X.112.1.217
pmid
15631594
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article reports a theoretical and experimental attempt to relate and contrast 2 traditionally separate research programs: inattentional blindness and attention capture. Inattentional blindness refers to failures to notice unexpected objects and events when attention is otherwise engaged. Attention capture research has traditionally used implicit indices (e.g., response times) to investigate automatic shifts of attention. Because attention capture usually measures performance whereas inattentional blindness measures awareness, the 2 fields have existed side by side with no shared theoretical framework. Here, the authors propose a theoretical unification, adapting several important effects from the attention capture literature to the context of sustained inattentional blindness. Although some stimulus properties can influence noticing of unexpected objects, the most influential factor affecting noticing is a person's own attentional goals. The authors conclude that many—but not all—aspects of attention capture apply to inattentional blindness but that these 2 classes of phenomena remain importantly distinct.

Journal

Psychological ReviewAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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