Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Silence That May Kill: When Aircrew Members Don’t Speak Up and Why

Silence That May Kill: When Aircrew Members Don’t Speak Up and Why Several accidents have shown that crew members’ failure to speak upcan have devastating consequences. Despite decades of crew resource management(CRM) training, this problem persists and still poses a risk to flight safety.To resolve this issue, we need to better understand why crewmembers choose silence over speaking up. We explored past speaking up behaviorand the reasons for silence in 1,751 crew members, who reported to have remainedsilent in half of all speaking up episodes they had experienced. Silence washighest for first officers and pursers, followed by flight attendants, andlowest for captains. Reasons for silence mainly concerned fears of damagingrelationships, of punishment, or operational pressures. We discuss significantgroup differences in the frequencies and reasons for silence and suggestcustomized interventions to specifically and effectively foster speakingup. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Silence That May Kill: When Aircrew Members Don’t Speak Up and Why

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-psychological-association/silence-that-may-kill-when-aircrew-members-don-t-speak-up-and-why-vEPJIZdtw0
Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Several accidents have shown that crew members’ failure to speak upcan have devastating consequences. Despite decades of crew resource management(CRM) training, this problem persists and still poses a risk to flight safety.To resolve this issue, we need to better understand why crewmembers choose silence over speaking up. We explored past speaking up behaviorand the reasons for silence in 1,751 crew members, who reported to have remainedsilent in half of all speaking up episodes they had experienced. Silence washighest for first officers and pursers, followed by flight attendants, andlowest for captains. Reasons for silence mainly concerned fears of damagingrelationships, of punishment, or operational pressures. We discuss significantgroup differences in the frequencies and reasons for silence and suggestcustomized interventions to specifically and effectively foster speakingup.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.