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Rule Fragmentation in the Airworthiness Regulations: A Human Factors Perspective

Rule Fragmentation in the Airworthiness Regulations: A Human Factors Perspective As a result of increasing organizational interdependence and integration ofsystems in commercial airline operation, it is argued that the manner in whichhuman factors issues are addressed in the aviation regulations is becomingincreasingly incompatible with human and organizational behavior in an airline.Error and workload are two of the more pervasive aspects of human factors in theairworthiness regulations and are both products of complex interactions amongequipment design, procedures, training, and the environment. However, theseaspects of human factors cannot be regulated on a localized basis, and a moresystemic, holistic approach to the regulation of error and workload is required.It is suggested that a safety case–based approach may be better usedas an adjunct to existing regulations for human factors issues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Rule Fragmentation in the Airworthiness Regulations: A Human Factors Perspective

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors , Volume 1 (2): 12 – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As a result of increasing organizational interdependence and integration ofsystems in commercial airline operation, it is argued that the manner in whichhuman factors issues are addressed in the aviation regulations is becomingincreasingly incompatible with human and organizational behavior in an airline.Error and workload are two of the more pervasive aspects of human factors in theairworthiness regulations and are both products of complex interactions amongequipment design, procedures, training, and the environment. However, theseaspects of human factors cannot be regulated on a localized basis, and a moresystemic, holistic approach to the regulation of error and workload is required.It is suggested that a safety case–based approach may be better usedas an adjunct to existing regulations for human factors issues.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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