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Ranking Pictorial Cues in Simulated Landing Flares

Ranking Pictorial Cues in Simulated Landing Flares Two-dimensional pictorial cues provide depth perceptioninformation that help pilots initiate the landing flare 10–20 ft from theground. Although prior studies established the importance of three specificcues, they failed to rank-order their importance. This exploratory paperpresents two studies, with different methodologies, that examine the effect ofthese pictorial cues on depth perception. In both studies, participantsexperienced simulated scenarios and attempted to initiate the landing flare10–20 ft above ground level. Study 1 included 121, and Study 2 included141, naïve participants with no prior flight experience. Combined, thefindings suggest that flight instructors, training literature, and airportarchitects should emphasize the runway above all other pictorial cues. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Ranking Pictorial Cues in Simulated Landing Flares

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000205
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two-dimensional pictorial cues provide depth perceptioninformation that help pilots initiate the landing flare 10–20 ft from theground. Although prior studies established the importance of three specificcues, they failed to rank-order their importance. This exploratory paperpresents two studies, with different methodologies, that examine the effect ofthese pictorial cues on depth perception. In both studies, participantsexperienced simulated scenarios and attempted to initiate the landing flare10–20 ft above ground level. Study 1 included 121, and Study 2 included141, naïve participants with no prior flight experience. Combined, thefindings suggest that flight instructors, training literature, and airportarchitects should emphasize the runway above all other pictorial cues.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2021

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