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Prevalence and Behavioral Styles of Fear of Flying

Prevalence and Behavioral Styles of Fear of Flying According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4thEdition (DSM-IV), fear of flying is a specific situational phobia, but it has a heterogeneouscharacter because it can be influenced by many other fears. Attention toward (monitoring) or awayfrom (blunting) threatening information is influenced by people’s control of voluntaryattention. In our online questionnaire study, 9,166 subjects (age 17–70 years) were selectedfor participation. The Flight Anxiety Modality (FAM) questionnaire and Miller Behavioral Style Scale(MBSS) were used to measure fear of flying and behavioral style. Also, demographic information wascollected. Women reported a higher FAM sum score than men, as predicted. Participants who scoredhigher on the MBSS were found to have also scored higher on the FAM. Participants who had neverflown before scored higher on the FAM than participants who had flown before. In this sample,monitoring can be associated with an increase in fear of flying. Future research should focus ongaining a more multicultural picture of fear of flying. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Prevalence and Behavioral Styles of Fear of Flying

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4thEdition (DSM-IV), fear of flying is a specific situational phobia, but it has a heterogeneouscharacter because it can be influenced by many other fears. Attention toward (monitoring) or awayfrom (blunting) threatening information is influenced by people’s control of voluntaryattention. In our online questionnaire study, 9,166 subjects (age 17–70 years) were selectedfor participation. The Flight Anxiety Modality (FAM) questionnaire and Miller Behavioral Style Scale(MBSS) were used to measure fear of flying and behavioral style. Also, demographic information wascollected. Women reported a higher FAM sum score than men, as predicted. Participants who scoredhigher on the MBSS were found to have also scored higher on the FAM. Participants who had neverflown before scored higher on the FAM than participants who had flown before. In this sample,monitoring can be associated with an increase in fear of flying. Future research should focus ongaining a more multicultural picture of fear of flying.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jun 3, 2013

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