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Predictive Validity of Knowledge Tests for Pilot Training Outcome

Predictive Validity of Knowledge Tests for Pilot Training Outcome Tests of subject-specific knowledge (mathematics, physics, and English as aforeign language for non-English-speaking countries) are commonly used in testbatteries for the selection of ab initio pilots – for example, the AirForce Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) or the German Aerospace Center (DLR)assessment. However, in validity research, knowledge tests are oftenunderrepresented. This study evaluated the predictive validity of knowledgetests compared with cognitive ability tests and school grades. The validitycriterion was the outcome of pilot training (pass/fail) of a preselectedgroup of applicants (N = 402) who completed a 2-year flighttraining program. The predictive validity of the entire test battery wasr = .55. Cognitive ability tests, knowledge tests, andschool grades emerged as comparably valid predictors. These findings arediscussed in the framework of Cattell’s theory of fluid and crystallizedintelligence, suggesting that knowledge tests are predictively valid becausethey are indicators of motivation and of being a good learner. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Predictive Validity of Knowledge Tests for Pilot Training Outcome

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000061
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tests of subject-specific knowledge (mathematics, physics, and English as aforeign language for non-English-speaking countries) are commonly used in testbatteries for the selection of ab initio pilots – for example, the AirForce Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) or the German Aerospace Center (DLR)assessment. However, in validity research, knowledge tests are oftenunderrepresented. This study evaluated the predictive validity of knowledgetests compared with cognitive ability tests and school grades. The validitycriterion was the outcome of pilot training (pass/fail) of a preselectedgroup of applicants (N = 402) who completed a 2-year flighttraining program. The predictive validity of the entire test battery wasr = .55. Cognitive ability tests, knowledge tests, andschool grades emerged as comparably valid predictors. These findings arediscussed in the framework of Cattell’s theory of fluid and crystallizedintelligence, suggesting that knowledge tests are predictively valid becausethey are indicators of motivation and of being a good learner.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Nov 17, 2014

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