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Perceived Effectiveness of Random Testing for Alcohol and Drugs in theAustralian Aviation Community

Perceived Effectiveness of Random Testing for Alcohol and Drugs in theAustralian Aviation Community Random testing for alcohol and other drugs (AODs) in individuals who performsafety-sensitive activities as part of their aviation role was introduced inAustralia in April 2009. One year later, an online survey (N =2,226) was conducted to investigate attitudes, behaviors, and knowledgeregarding random testing and to gauge perceptions regarding its effectiveness.Private, recreational, and student pilots were less likely than industrypersonnel to report being aware of the requirement (86.5% versus97.1%), to have undergone testing (76.5% versus 96.1%), andto know of others who had undergone testing (39.9% versus 84.3%),and they had more positive attitudes toward random testing than industrypersonnel. However, logistic regression analyses indicated that random testingis more effective at deterring AOD use among industrypersonnel. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Perceived Effectiveness of Random Testing for Alcohol and Drugs in theAustralian Aviation Community

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Random testing for alcohol and other drugs (AODs) in individuals who performsafety-sensitive activities as part of their aviation role was introduced inAustralia in April 2009. One year later, an online survey (N =2,226) was conducted to investigate attitudes, behaviors, and knowledgeregarding random testing and to gauge perceptions regarding its effectiveness.Private, recreational, and student pilots were less likely than industrypersonnel to report being aware of the requirement (86.5% versus97.1%), to have undergone testing (76.5% versus 96.1%), andto know of others who had undergone testing (39.9% versus 84.3%),and they had more positive attitudes toward random testing than industrypersonnel. However, logistic regression analyses indicated that random testingis more effective at deterring AOD use among industrypersonnel.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2012

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