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Passenger Attitudes to Flying on a Single-Pilot Commercial Aircraft

Passenger Attitudes to Flying on a Single-Pilot Commercial Aircraft There is little specific research on people’sopinions of single-pilot commercial airline operation and whether they arewilling to fly by this means. This study examines passengers’ attitudesto help determine their willingness to fly on an aircraft of this type. Part 1involved four focus groups providing their views on the matter. In Part 2, anonline survey was developed from the output of the focus groups that gatheredpassenger perceptions of single-pilot operations. The feedback from the focusgroups highlighted distrust in technology, concerns about pilot health andworkload, and the need for more information on single-pilot operations but alsothat if there were substantial savings passengers may be willing to fly on suchan aircraft. The results of the survey suggested three main dimensions topassenger opinion on the subject: state of the pilot; trust in the technology;ticket price and reputation. Responses on these scales could determine with somecertainty passengers’ willingness to fly or not to fly on a single-pilotairliner. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Passenger Attitudes to Flying on a Single-Pilot Commercial Aircraft

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000164
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is little specific research on people’sopinions of single-pilot commercial airline operation and whether they arewilling to fly by this means. This study examines passengers’ attitudesto help determine their willingness to fly on an aircraft of this type. Part 1involved four focus groups providing their views on the matter. In Part 2, anonline survey was developed from the output of the focus groups that gatheredpassenger perceptions of single-pilot operations. The feedback from the focusgroups highlighted distrust in technology, concerns about pilot health andworkload, and the need for more information on single-pilot operations but alsothat if there were substantial savings passengers may be willing to fly on suchan aircraft. The results of the survey suggested three main dimensions topassenger opinion on the subject: state of the pilot; trust in the technology;ticket price and reputation. Responses on these scales could determine with somecertainty passengers’ willingness to fly or not to fly on a single-pilotairliner.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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