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“It’s Systemic”: Environmental Racial Microaggressions Experienced by Black Undergraduates at a Predominantly White Institution

“It’s Systemic”: Environmental Racial Microaggressions Experienced by Black Undergraduates at a... Limited studies of Black students’ experiences of racial microaggressions specifically address environmental racial microaggressions. Environmental racial microaggressions have no apparent offender, affect all persons of color in a given social setting, and are more evident at a systemic or environmental level such as in education, government, and the economy (Nadal, Skolnik, & Wong, 2012; Sue et al., 2007). Using resilience theory as a framework, this study investigates environmental racial microaggressions experienced by Black college students attending a predominantly White institution (PWI). Four focus group interviews were conducted with Black college students attending a large Midwestern PWI. Findings indicated that students experienced six types of environmental racial microaggressions in various contexts at the university: (a) segregation, (b) lack of representation, (c) campus response to criminality, (d) cultural bias in courses, (e) tokenism, and (f) pressure to conform. Gender differences emerged where only women described experiencing cultural bias in courses and only men spoke explicitly about the lack of representation of persons of color in leadership positions within campus employment. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Diversity in Higher Education American Psychological Association

“It’s Systemic”: Environmental Racial Microaggressions Experienced by Black Undergraduates at a Predominantly White Institution

Journal of Diversity in Higher Education , Volume 13 (1): 12 – Mar 2, 2020

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
© 2019 National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education
ISSN
1938-8926
eISSN
1938-8934
DOI
10.1037/dhe0000121
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Limited studies of Black students’ experiences of racial microaggressions specifically address environmental racial microaggressions. Environmental racial microaggressions have no apparent offender, affect all persons of color in a given social setting, and are more evident at a systemic or environmental level such as in education, government, and the economy (Nadal, Skolnik, & Wong, 2012; Sue et al., 2007). Using resilience theory as a framework, this study investigates environmental racial microaggressions experienced by Black college students attending a predominantly White institution (PWI). Four focus group interviews were conducted with Black college students attending a large Midwestern PWI. Findings indicated that students experienced six types of environmental racial microaggressions in various contexts at the university: (a) segregation, (b) lack of representation, (c) campus response to criminality, (d) cultural bias in courses, (e) tokenism, and (f) pressure to conform. Gender differences emerged where only women described experiencing cultural bias in courses and only men spoke explicitly about the lack of representation of persons of color in leadership positions within campus employment. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Diversity in Higher EducationAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Mar 2, 2020

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