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Flight Crew Errors in Challenging and Stressful Situations

Flight Crew Errors in Challenging and Stressful Situations Emergencies and other threatening situations challengethe cognitive capabilities of even the most skilled performers. While theeffects of acute stress on cognition and performance have been examined indiverse laboratory studies, few studies have focused on skilled performers. Weanalyzed 12 airline accidents to determine the types of errors arising insituations that are highly challenging and probably stressful. We identified 212flight crew errors from accident investigation reports; these errors weregrouped into eight higher-level error categories. Cognitive factors contributingto vulnerability to these errors were identified and related to theoreticalmodels of stress. Finally, we suggest specific ways to guard againststress-related errors by enhancing training, operating procedures, and cockpitinterfaces. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

Flight Crew Errors in Challenging and Stressful Situations

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Emergencies and other threatening situations challengethe cognitive capabilities of even the most skilled performers. While theeffects of acute stress on cognition and performance have been examined indiverse laboratory studies, few studies have focused on skilled performers. Weanalyzed 12 airline accidents to determine the types of errors arising insituations that are highly challenging and probably stressful. We identified 212flight crew errors from accident investigation reports; these errors weregrouped into eight higher-level error categories. Cognitive factors contributingto vulnerability to these errors were identified and related to theoreticalmodels of stress. Finally, we suggest specific ways to guard againststress-related errors by enhancing training, operating procedures, and cockpitinterfaces.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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