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Fatigue Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Frequency, Characteristics, and Associated Factors

Fatigue Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Frequency, Characteristics, and Associated Factors Objectives:To document the frequency, characteristics, and factors associated with fatigue following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design:Survey methodology and multivariate statistical design. Setting:Rehabilitation center and community. Participants:452 participants aged 16 years and over with minor to severe TBI who answered a questionnaire measuring diverse aspects of fatigue as well as different dimensions of psychological distress, pain, and sleep quality. Measures:Proportion of participants reporting being significantly fatigued. Validated measures of fatigue, sleep quality, and psychological distress. Results of a logistic regression analysis. Results:Significant fatigue was reported by 68.5% of participants. Mental fatigue was the most prominent type of fatigue, followed by physical fatigue. Fatigue was present even several years following the accident and had many perceived impacts on day-to-day function. Factors associated with fatigue were a shorter time since injury; being on long-term disability leave; and higher levels of sleep problems, cognitive disturbances, and anxiety. Conclusion:Fatigue is a prevalent problem after TBI that requires more clinical and scientific attention because it probably has important repercussions on the quality of rehabilitation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Psychology American Psychological Association

Fatigue Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Frequency, Characteristics, and Associated Factors

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0090-5550
eISSN
1939-1544
DOI
10.1037/0090-5550.51.2.140
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives:To document the frequency, characteristics, and factors associated with fatigue following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Design:Survey methodology and multivariate statistical design. Setting:Rehabilitation center and community. Participants:452 participants aged 16 years and over with minor to severe TBI who answered a questionnaire measuring diverse aspects of fatigue as well as different dimensions of psychological distress, pain, and sleep quality. Measures:Proportion of participants reporting being significantly fatigued. Validated measures of fatigue, sleep quality, and psychological distress. Results of a logistic regression analysis. Results:Significant fatigue was reported by 68.5% of participants. Mental fatigue was the most prominent type of fatigue, followed by physical fatigue. Fatigue was present even several years following the accident and had many perceived impacts on day-to-day function. Factors associated with fatigue were a shorter time since injury; being on long-term disability leave; and higher levels of sleep problems, cognitive disturbances, and anxiety. Conclusion:Fatigue is a prevalent problem after TBI that requires more clinical and scientific attention because it probably has important repercussions on the quality of rehabilitation.

Journal

Rehabilitation PsychologyAmerican Psychological Association

Published: May 1, 2006

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