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DSM-III and the Politics of Truth

DSM-III and the Politics of Truth Attacks upon and defenses of DSM-III continue to be a popular topic for professional journals. This article argues that traditional and prevalent beliefs about the relationship between science and politics cause many communications about DSM-III to become mired in double-talk, in which disavowal of DSM-III’s political aspects often serves to affirm that which is being denied. We look at DSM-III through a conceptual lens in which science and politics are mutually exclusive. Consequently, any mention of the political dimensions of DSM-III may be automatically perceived as an attack upon the scientific integrity of the taxonomy. Integral aspects of science and politics should be acknowledged, and self-defeating dichotomous reasoning about DSM-III’s scientific and political dimensions should be avoided. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Psychologist American Psychological Association

DSM-III and the Politics of Truth

American Psychologist , Volume 40 (5): 9 – May 1, 1985

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References (37)

Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Psychological Association
ISSN
0003-066x
eISSN
1935-990X
DOI
10.1037/0003-066X.40.5.513
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Attacks upon and defenses of DSM-III continue to be a popular topic for professional journals. This article argues that traditional and prevalent beliefs about the relationship between science and politics cause many communications about DSM-III to become mired in double-talk, in which disavowal of DSM-III’s political aspects often serves to affirm that which is being denied. We look at DSM-III through a conceptual lens in which science and politics are mutually exclusive. Consequently, any mention of the political dimensions of DSM-III may be automatically perceived as an attack upon the scientific integrity of the taxonomy. Integral aspects of science and politics should be acknowledged, and self-defeating dichotomous reasoning about DSM-III’s scientific and political dimensions should be avoided.

Journal

American PsychologistAmerican Psychological Association

Published: May 1, 1985

There are no references for this article.