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Automation Surprise

Automation Surprise Automation surprise (AS) has often been associated withaviation safety incidents. Although numerous laboratory studies have beenconducted, few data are available from routine flight operations. A survey amonga representative sample of 200 Dutch airline pilots was used to determine theprevalence of AS and the severity of its consequences, and to test some of thefactors leading to AS. Results show that AS is a relatively widespreadphenomenon that occurs three times per year per pilot on average but rarely hasserious consequences. In less than 10% of the AS cases that were reviewed, anundesired aircraft state was induced. Reportable occurrences are estimated tooccur only once every 1–3 years per pilot. Factors leading to ahigher prevalence of AS include less flying experience, increasing complexity ofthe flight control mode, and flight duty periods of over 8 hr. It isconcluded that AS is a manifestation of system and interface complexity ratherthan cognitive errors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors American Psychological Association

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Publisher
American Psychological Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Hogrefe Publishing
ISSN
2192-0923
eISSN
2192-0931
DOI
10.1027/2192-0923/a000113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Automation surprise (AS) has often been associated withaviation safety incidents. Although numerous laboratory studies have beenconducted, few data are available from routine flight operations. A survey amonga representative sample of 200 Dutch airline pilots was used to determine theprevalence of AS and the severity of its consequences, and to test some of thefactors leading to AS. Results show that AS is a relatively widespreadphenomenon that occurs three times per year per pilot on average but rarely hasserious consequences. In less than 10% of the AS cases that were reviewed, anundesired aircraft state was induced. Reportable occurrences are estimated tooccur only once every 1–3 years per pilot. Factors leading to ahigher prevalence of AS include less flying experience, increasing complexity ofthe flight control mode, and flight duty periods of over 8 hr. It isconcluded that AS is a manifestation of system and interface complexity ratherthan cognitive errors.

Journal

Aviation Psychology and Applied Human FactorsAmerican Psychological Association

Published: Jan 1, 2017

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