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Comparison of mania and depression after brain injury: causal factors

Comparison of mania and depression after brain injury: causal factors Patients who developed secondary mania after brain injury (N = 17) had a significantly greater frequency of injury to right hemisphere areas connected with the limbic system than poststroke patients with major depression (N = 31), who had injury primarily in the left frontal cortex and basal ganglia. For patients without mood disturbance after brain injury (N = 28), the location of the lesion was not significant. Secondary mania patients also had a significantly greater frequency of family history of affective disorder than did the other two groups. These results suggest that an interaction between injury to certain areas of the right hemisphere and genetic factors or other neuropathological conditions produces http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Psychiatry American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)

Comparison of mania and depression after brain injury: causal factors

Comparison of mania and depression after brain injury: causal factors

American Journal of Psychiatry , Volume 145 (2): 172 – Feb 1, 1988

Abstract

Patients who developed secondary mania after brain injury (N = 17) had a significantly greater frequency of injury to right hemisphere areas connected with the limbic system than poststroke patients with major depression (N = 31), who had injury primarily in the left frontal cortex and basal ganglia. For patients without mood disturbance after brain injury (N = 28), the location of the lesion was not significant. Secondary mania patients also had a significantly greater frequency of family history of affective disorder than did the other two groups. These results suggest that an interaction between injury to certain areas of the right hemisphere and genetic factors or other neuropathological conditions produces

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Publisher
American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Psychiatric Association. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0002-953X
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Patients who developed secondary mania after brain injury (N = 17) had a significantly greater frequency of injury to right hemisphere areas connected with the limbic system than poststroke patients with major depression (N = 31), who had injury primarily in the left frontal cortex and basal ganglia. For patients without mood disturbance after brain injury (N = 28), the location of the lesion was not significant. Secondary mania patients also had a significantly greater frequency of family history of affective disorder than did the other two groups. These results suggest that an interaction between injury to certain areas of the right hemisphere and genetic factors or other neuropathological conditions produces

Journal

American Journal of PsychiatryAmerican Psychiatric Publishing, Inc (Journal)

Published: Feb 1, 1988

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