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Fat Thickness and Developmental Status in Childhood and Adolescence

Fat Thickness and Developmental Status in Childhood and Adolescence Abstract What is the relationship between the degree of fatness, and size and maturity status during the growing period? If fatness and growth progress are correlated, is the relationship straight-line, or is there a point beyond which increased fatness is no longer associated with greater size and advanced maturity? Logically, one would expect fatter Children to be both taller and developmentally more advanced. Calories are growth-promoting. With more food, children of the same racial stock are taller in the United States than in their homelands.1,2 American boys and girls from economically superior homes are consistently larger in body size.3 Children in the United States mature earlier than their English cousins.4 Beyond such inferential data, however, information relating fatness to size and maturity status is hard to come by. Despite the many investigations of clinically obese children, definitive data on stature, bone age, and age at menarche as related References 1. Boas, F.: Changes in Bodily Form of Descendents of Immigrants , Immigration Commission Report , Washington, 1911. 2. Spier, L.: Growth of Japanese Children Born in America and in Japan , Publications in Anthropology , Vol. 3, No. (1) , Seattle, Wash., University of Washington, 1929. 3. O'Brien, R.; Gershick, M. A., and Hunt, E. P.: Body Measurements of American Boys and Girls for Garment and Pattern Construction , Miscellaneous Publications 366, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, 1941. 4. Morant, G. M.: Secular Changes in the Heights of British People , Proc. Roy. Soc. , s.B, 137:443, 1950.Crossref 5. Talbot, N. B.: Obesity in Children , M. Clin. North America 29:1217, 1945. 6. Talbot, N. B.; Sobel, E. H.; McArthur, J. W., and Crawford, J. D.: Functional Endocrinology from Birth Through Adolescence , Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1952. 7. Quaade, F.: Obese Children , Copenhagen, Danish Science Press, 1955. 8. Garn, S. M., and Haskell, J. A.: Fat Changes During Adolescence , Science 129:1615, 1959.Crossref 9. Greulich, W. W., and Pyle, S. I.: Radiographic Atlas of Skeletal Development of the Hand and Wrist , Stanford, Calif., Stanford University Press, 1950. 10. Garn, S. M.: Lewis, A. B.; Koski, K., and Polacheck, D. L.: The Sex Difference in Tooth Calcification , J. Dent. Res. 37:561, 1958.Crossref 11. Haskell, J. A.: A Roentgenographic Study of the Relationship Between Tibial Length and Stature in a Living Population, unpublished M.A. thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz., 1959. 12. Garn, S. M.: The Radiographic Approach to Body Composition, in Henshel, A., and Brozek, J., Editors: Symposium on Body Composition, Human Biol., to be published. 13. Garn, S. M., and Shamir, Z.: Methods for Research in Human Growth , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1958. 14. McCall, W. A.: How to Measure in Education , New York, The Macmillan Company, 1922. 15. Johnson, P. O.: Statistical Methods in Research , New York, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1949. 16. Lacey, J. I.: The Evaluation of Autonomic Responses, Toward a General Solution , Ann. New York Acad. Sc. 67:123, 1956.Crossref 17. Sontag, L. W.; Baker, C. T., and Nelson, V. L.: Mental Growth and Personality Development: a Longitudinal Study , Monog. Soc. Res. Child Develop. , No. (23) , 1958. 18. Garn, S. M.: Fat Weight and Fat Placement in the Female , Science 125:1091, 1957.Crossref 19. Garn, S. M.: Roentgenogrammetric Determinations of Body Composition , Human Biol. 29:337, 1957. 20. Hammond, J.: Progress in the Physiology of Farm Animals , Butterworth Scientific Publications, London, Butterworth & Co., Ltd., 1954. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Fat Thickness and Developmental Status in Childhood and Adolescence

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1960 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6916
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1960.02070030748008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract What is the relationship between the degree of fatness, and size and maturity status during the growing period? If fatness and growth progress are correlated, is the relationship straight-line, or is there a point beyond which increased fatness is no longer associated with greater size and advanced maturity? Logically, one would expect fatter Children to be both taller and developmentally more advanced. Calories are growth-promoting. With more food, children of the same racial stock are taller in the United States than in their homelands.1,2 American boys and girls from economically superior homes are consistently larger in body size.3 Children in the United States mature earlier than their English cousins.4 Beyond such inferential data, however, information relating fatness to size and maturity status is hard to come by. Despite the many investigations of clinically obese children, definitive data on stature, bone age, and age at menarche as related References 1. Boas, F.: Changes in Bodily Form of Descendents of Immigrants , Immigration Commission Report , Washington, 1911. 2. Spier, L.: Growth of Japanese Children Born in America and in Japan , Publications in Anthropology , Vol. 3, No. (1) , Seattle, Wash., University of Washington, 1929. 3. O'Brien, R.; Gershick, M. A., and Hunt, E. P.: Body Measurements of American Boys and Girls for Garment and Pattern Construction , Miscellaneous Publications 366, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, 1941. 4. Morant, G. M.: Secular Changes in the Heights of British People , Proc. Roy. Soc. , s.B, 137:443, 1950.Crossref 5. Talbot, N. B.: Obesity in Children , M. Clin. North America 29:1217, 1945. 6. Talbot, N. B.; Sobel, E. H.; McArthur, J. W., and Crawford, J. D.: Functional Endocrinology from Birth Through Adolescence , Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1952. 7. Quaade, F.: Obese Children , Copenhagen, Danish Science Press, 1955. 8. Garn, S. M., and Haskell, J. A.: Fat Changes During Adolescence , Science 129:1615, 1959.Crossref 9. Greulich, W. W., and Pyle, S. I.: Radiographic Atlas of Skeletal Development of the Hand and Wrist , Stanford, Calif., Stanford University Press, 1950. 10. Garn, S. M.: Lewis, A. B.; Koski, K., and Polacheck, D. L.: The Sex Difference in Tooth Calcification , J. Dent. Res. 37:561, 1958.Crossref 11. Haskell, J. A.: A Roentgenographic Study of the Relationship Between Tibial Length and Stature in a Living Population, unpublished M.A. thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz., 1959. 12. Garn, S. M.: The Radiographic Approach to Body Composition, in Henshel, A., and Brozek, J., Editors: Symposium on Body Composition, Human Biol., to be published. 13. Garn, S. M., and Shamir, Z.: Methods for Research in Human Growth , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1958. 14. McCall, W. A.: How to Measure in Education , New York, The Macmillan Company, 1922. 15. Johnson, P. O.: Statistical Methods in Research , New York, Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1949. 16. Lacey, J. I.: The Evaluation of Autonomic Responses, Toward a General Solution , Ann. New York Acad. Sc. 67:123, 1956.Crossref 17. Sontag, L. W.; Baker, C. T., and Nelson, V. L.: Mental Growth and Personality Development: a Longitudinal Study , Monog. Soc. Res. Child Develop. , No. (23) , 1958. 18. Garn, S. M.: Fat Weight and Fat Placement in the Female , Science 125:1091, 1957.Crossref 19. Garn, S. M.: Roentgenogrammetric Determinations of Body Composition , Human Biol. 29:337, 1957. 20. Hammond, J.: Progress in the Physiology of Farm Animals , Butterworth Scientific Publications, London, Butterworth & Co., Ltd., 1954.

Journal

A.M.A. Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1960

References