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Early Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Childhood

Early Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Childhood Abstract There is some tendency toward reliance on clinical findings for early diagnosis of primary tuberculosis. Practitioners of both pediatrics and general medicine are guilty of this unjustified approach. Many symptoms and symptom complexes have been mentioned. In the Scandanavian countries it has been noted that 95% of the cases of erythema nodosum are associated with tuberculosis.1 In the United States, however, erythema nodosum occurs much oftener in association with rheumatic fever and occurs infrequently under any conditions. At a recent round-table discussion on tuberculosis conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics, a group of approximately 35 participants was polled as to the frequency of erythema nodosum. Only one member reported the incidence of as many as two cases each year, and his residence was in northern Michigan, a climate comparable to that of the Scandanavian countries. In the past, presence of phlyctenular conjunctivitis has been considered almost pathognomic of References 1. Miller, J. A., and Wallgren, A.: Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Adults and Children , New York, Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1939, p. 126. 2. Kendig, E. L., Jr., and Angell, F. L.: Streptomycin and Promizole in the Treatment of Widespread Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a 19-Day-Old Infant: Case Report . Am. Rev. Tuberc. 61:747 ( (May) ) 1950. 3. Kendig, E. L., Jr.: Tuberculosis in the Very Young: Report of Three Cases Less Than One Month of Age , Am. Rev. Tbc. 70:161 ( (July) ) 1954. 4. Kendig, E. L., Jr.: The Routine Tuberculin Test—A Neglected Pediatric Procedure , J. Pediat. 40:813 ( (June) ) 1952.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Early Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Childhood

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6916
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1956.02060030552003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract There is some tendency toward reliance on clinical findings for early diagnosis of primary tuberculosis. Practitioners of both pediatrics and general medicine are guilty of this unjustified approach. Many symptoms and symptom complexes have been mentioned. In the Scandanavian countries it has been noted that 95% of the cases of erythema nodosum are associated with tuberculosis.1 In the United States, however, erythema nodosum occurs much oftener in association with rheumatic fever and occurs infrequently under any conditions. At a recent round-table discussion on tuberculosis conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics, a group of approximately 35 participants was polled as to the frequency of erythema nodosum. Only one member reported the incidence of as many as two cases each year, and his residence was in northern Michigan, a climate comparable to that of the Scandanavian countries. In the past, presence of phlyctenular conjunctivitis has been considered almost pathognomic of References 1. Miller, J. A., and Wallgren, A.: Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Adults and Children , New York, Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1939, p. 126. 2. Kendig, E. L., Jr., and Angell, F. L.: Streptomycin and Promizole in the Treatment of Widespread Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a 19-Day-Old Infant: Case Report . Am. Rev. Tuberc. 61:747 ( (May) ) 1950. 3. Kendig, E. L., Jr.: Tuberculosis in the Very Young: Report of Three Cases Less Than One Month of Age , Am. Rev. Tbc. 70:161 ( (July) ) 1954. 4. Kendig, E. L., Jr.: The Routine Tuberculin Test—A Neglected Pediatric Procedure , J. Pediat. 40:813 ( (June) ) 1952.Crossref

Journal

A.M.A. Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1956

References