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Revealing Naïveté and Sophistication from Procrastination and Preproperation†

Revealing Naïveté and Sophistication from Procrastination and Preproperation† AbstractThis paper proposes a novel way of distinguishing whether a person is naïve or sophisticated about her own dynamic inconsistency using only her task-completion behavior. It shows that adding an unused extra opportunity to complete a task can lead a naïve (but not a sophisticated) person to complete it later and can lead a sophisticated (but not a naïve) person to complete the task earlier. These results provide a framework for revealing preference and sophistication types from behavior in a general environment that includes that of O’Donoghue and Rabin (1999). (JEL D15, D91) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Economic Journal: Microeconomics American Economic Association

Revealing Naïveté and Sophistication from Procrastination and Preproperation†

Revealing Naïveté and Sophistication from Procrastination and Preproperation†

American Economic Journal: Microeconomics , Volume 13 (2) – May 1, 2021

Abstract

AbstractThis paper proposes a novel way of distinguishing whether a person is naïve or sophisticated about her own dynamic inconsistency using only her task-completion behavior. It shows that adding an unused extra opportunity to complete a task can lead a naïve (but not a sophisticated) person to complete it later and can lead a sophisticated (but not a naïve) person to complete the task earlier. These results provide a framework for revealing preference and sophistication types from behavior in a general environment that includes that of O’Donoghue and Rabin (1999). (JEL D15, D91)

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Publisher
American Economic Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2021 © American Economic Association
ISSN
1945-7685
DOI
10.1257/mic.20170270
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper proposes a novel way of distinguishing whether a person is naïve or sophisticated about her own dynamic inconsistency using only her task-completion behavior. It shows that adding an unused extra opportunity to complete a task can lead a naïve (but not a sophisticated) person to complete it later and can lead a sophisticated (but not a naïve) person to complete the task earlier. These results provide a framework for revealing preference and sophistication types from behavior in a general environment that includes that of O’Donoghue and Rabin (1999). (JEL D15, D91)

Journal

American Economic Journal: MicroeconomicsAmerican Economic Association

Published: May 1, 2021

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