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Long-Run Effects from Comprehensive Student Support: Evidence from Pathways to Education†

Long-Run Effects from Comprehensive Student Support: Evidence from Pathways to Education† AbstractOffering comprehensive education support services to disadvantaged students shows promise for improving academic attainment. We explore longer-term impacts of the Pathways to Education program, a set of coaching, tutoring, group activities, and financial incentives initially offered in 2001 to grade-nine students living in the largest public housing community in Toronto. Using a difference-in-difference methodology and matching school records to income tax data through age 28 for a sample of students living in public housing under similar circumstances, we find that Pathways eligibility increased adult annual earnings by 19 percent, employment by 14 percent, and reduced welfare receipt by more than 30 percent. (JEL I22, I23, I24, I26, I28, L31) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Economic Review: Insights American Economic Association

Long-Run Effects from Comprehensive Student Support: Evidence from Pathways to Education†

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Publisher
American Economic Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 © American Economic Association
ISSN
2640-205X
eISSN
2640-2068
DOI
10.1257/aeri.20190114
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOffering comprehensive education support services to disadvantaged students shows promise for improving academic attainment. We explore longer-term impacts of the Pathways to Education program, a set of coaching, tutoring, group activities, and financial incentives initially offered in 2001 to grade-nine students living in the largest public housing community in Toronto. Using a difference-in-difference methodology and matching school records to income tax data through age 28 for a sample of students living in public housing under similar circumstances, we find that Pathways eligibility increased adult annual earnings by 19 percent, employment by 14 percent, and reduced welfare receipt by more than 30 percent. (JEL I22, I23, I24, I26, I28, L31)

Journal

American Economic Review: InsightsAmerican Economic Association

Published: Jun 1, 2020

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