Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods

The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods RHODORA, Vol. 116, No. 967, pp. 359­362, 2014 E Copyright 2014 by the New England Botanical Club BOOK REVIEW The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods by Andrew M. Barton, Alan S. White, and Charles V. Cogbill. 2012. 304 pp. illus. ISBN 978-1-58465-832-0 $29.95 (paper); 978-1-61168-295-3 $27.99 (ebook). University of New Hampshire Press, Durham, NH. In the year 1600, the landscape now known as the Maine Woods was unbroken. Forest cover was effectively 100 percent, just as it had been for more than ten thousand years. By 1900, forest cover had declined by more than thirty percent and two million hectares of new farmland struggled to sustain an influx of European settlers. Most of the farms were not up to the task and were eventually abandoned. In their wake, forest cover rebounded to more than 90 percent. Today, Maine's status as the most forested state in the nation is secure. Nonetheless, as in all New England states, the trajectory has again turned downward. This time, the Maine Woods are giving way to exurban sprawl creeping up from the south and to second homes that are perforating the north. This record of forest loss, recovery, and renewed threat is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rhodora Allen Press

The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods

Rhodora , Volume 116 (967) – Jul 1, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/allen-press/the-changing-nature-of-the-maine-woods-2KKo44EgKs
Publisher
Allen Press
Copyright
New England Botanical Club
Subject
BOOK REVIEWS
ISSN
0035-4902
DOI
10.3119/0035-4902-116.967.359
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RHODORA, Vol. 116, No. 967, pp. 359­362, 2014 E Copyright 2014 by the New England Botanical Club BOOK REVIEW The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods by Andrew M. Barton, Alan S. White, and Charles V. Cogbill. 2012. 304 pp. illus. ISBN 978-1-58465-832-0 $29.95 (paper); 978-1-61168-295-3 $27.99 (ebook). University of New Hampshire Press, Durham, NH. In the year 1600, the landscape now known as the Maine Woods was unbroken. Forest cover was effectively 100 percent, just as it had been for more than ten thousand years. By 1900, forest cover had declined by more than thirty percent and two million hectares of new farmland struggled to sustain an influx of European settlers. Most of the farms were not up to the task and were eventually abandoned. In their wake, forest cover rebounded to more than 90 percent. Today, Maine's status as the most forested state in the nation is secure. Nonetheless, as in all New England states, the trajectory has again turned downward. This time, the Maine Woods are giving way to exurban sprawl creeping up from the south and to second homes that are perforating the north. This record of forest loss, recovery, and renewed threat is

Journal

RhodoraAllen Press

Published: Jul 1, 2014

There are no references for this article.