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Special Issue: Advances in the Use of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback for Optimal Performance

Special Issue: Advances in the Use of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback for Optimal Performance Biofeedback Volume 39, Issue 1, pp. 1­3 DOI: 10.5298/1081-5937-39.1.10 EAssociation for Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback www.aapb.org FROM THE EDITOR Editor in Chief: Donald Moss, PhD Guest Editor: Rae Tattenbaum, MSW, LCSW, BCN Editors' Introduction The cover of this Spring 2011 issue of Biofeedback shows a view of the Olympic cauldron of the Vancouver Winter Olympics as a fitting symbol for the human aspiration to reach higher levels of athletic achievement (our thanks to "Tourism Vancouver" for the use of this photo). Since the opening days of the biofeedback movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the biofeedback paradigm has excited visions of expanding human potential (Moss, 1999; Moss & Wilson, in press). Early biofeedback research showed human beings gaining enhanced awareness and control over visceral physiology (Miller, 1969), musculature (Basmajian, 1967), and states of consciousness (Kamiya, 1969). Barbara Brown, the first president of the Biofeedback Research Society, proclaimed that biofeedback could give to the human being a new mind and a new body (Brown, 1974). Later, she imaged this new mind as a supermind with expanded consciousness and unlimited potential (Brown, 1980). This Special Issue provides a broad spectrum of articles showing how biofeedback and neurofeedback are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biofeedback Allen Press

Special Issue: Advances in the Use of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback for Optimal Performance

Biofeedback , Volume 39 (1) – Apr 1, 2011

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Publisher
Allen Press
Copyright
Association for Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback
Subject
FROM THE EDITOR
ISSN
1081-5937
eISSN
2158-348X
DOI
10.5298/1081-5937-39.1.10
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Biofeedback Volume 39, Issue 1, pp. 1­3 DOI: 10.5298/1081-5937-39.1.10 EAssociation for Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback www.aapb.org FROM THE EDITOR Editor in Chief: Donald Moss, PhD Guest Editor: Rae Tattenbaum, MSW, LCSW, BCN Editors' Introduction The cover of this Spring 2011 issue of Biofeedback shows a view of the Olympic cauldron of the Vancouver Winter Olympics as a fitting symbol for the human aspiration to reach higher levels of athletic achievement (our thanks to "Tourism Vancouver" for the use of this photo). Since the opening days of the biofeedback movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the biofeedback paradigm has excited visions of expanding human potential (Moss, 1999; Moss & Wilson, in press). Early biofeedback research showed human beings gaining enhanced awareness and control over visceral physiology (Miller, 1969), musculature (Basmajian, 1967), and states of consciousness (Kamiya, 1969). Barbara Brown, the first president of the Biofeedback Research Society, proclaimed that biofeedback could give to the human being a new mind and a new body (Brown, 1974). Later, she imaged this new mind as a supermind with expanded consciousness and unlimited potential (Brown, 1980). This Special Issue provides a broad spectrum of articles showing how biofeedback and neurofeedback are

Journal

BiofeedbackAllen Press

Published: Apr 1, 2011

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