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NEBC Meeting News

NEBC Meeting News RHODORA, Vol. 116, No. 968, pp. 506­507, 2014 E Copyright 2014 by the New England Botanical Club NEBC MEETING NEWS September 2014. Bryan Hamlin introduced Russ Cohen, author of Wild Plants I have Known...and Eaten, who spoke on ``Edible Wild Plants and Mushrooms of New England.'' Mr. Cohen took the audience chronologically through a New England foraging season and shared his culinary suggestions for a long list of wild edibles along the way. He explained how foraging connects one with nature because it makes the forager very aware of seasonality. For example, he contrasted the brief, ten-day harvest period for black locust flowers (which he later explained are edible both raw and cooked as fritters) with standard grocery store shopping, in which many fruits, vegetables, and herbs are available year round. Similarly, Mr. Cohen noted that foraging fosters awareness of plant communities, allowing foragers to predict when a wild edible plant is likely to be encountered based on observations of typically co-occurring species. He stressed the importance of conservationminded plant and mushroom foraging to avoid destructive harvesting of native species that are uncommon in the landscape. Mr. Cohen clarified that, for him, foraging is a fun way to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rhodora Allen Press

NEBC Meeting News

Rhodora , Volume 116 (968) – Oct 1, 2014

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Publisher
Allen Press
Copyright
New England Botanical Club
Subject
NEBC MEETING NEWS
ISSN
0035-4902
DOI
10.3119/0035-4902-116.968.506
Publisher site
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Abstract

RHODORA, Vol. 116, No. 968, pp. 506­507, 2014 E Copyright 2014 by the New England Botanical Club NEBC MEETING NEWS September 2014. Bryan Hamlin introduced Russ Cohen, author of Wild Plants I have Known...and Eaten, who spoke on ``Edible Wild Plants and Mushrooms of New England.'' Mr. Cohen took the audience chronologically through a New England foraging season and shared his culinary suggestions for a long list of wild edibles along the way. He explained how foraging connects one with nature because it makes the forager very aware of seasonality. For example, he contrasted the brief, ten-day harvest period for black locust flowers (which he later explained are edible both raw and cooked as fritters) with standard grocery store shopping, in which many fruits, vegetables, and herbs are available year round. Similarly, Mr. Cohen noted that foraging fosters awareness of plant communities, allowing foragers to predict when a wild edible plant is likely to be encountered based on observations of typically co-occurring species. He stressed the importance of conservationminded plant and mushroom foraging to avoid destructive harvesting of native species that are uncommon in the landscape. Mr. Cohen clarified that, for him, foraging is a fun way to

Journal

RhodoraAllen Press

Published: Oct 1, 2014

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